Crew: Expedition 52

Began June 2, 2017; will transition to Expedition 53 on Sept. 3, 2017

First Part

Transferred from Expedition 51

Fyodor Yurchikhin, Roscosmos
     Commander
Jack Fischer, NASA
     Flight Engineer
Peggy Whitson*, NASA
     Flight Engineer

Launched: April 20, 2017, aboard Soyuz MS-04
Expected landing: Sept. 3, 2017

* Whitson was given a three-month mission extension and will return to Earth in September 2017 with Soyuz MS-04. She flew to space Nov. 17, 2016 aboard Soyuz MS-03.

Second Part

Docking July 28, 2017

Sergey Ryazansky, Roscosmos
     Flight Engineer
Paolo Nespoli, ESA
     Flight Engineer
Randy Bresnik, NASA
     Flight Engineer

Launching: July 28, 2017, aboard Soyuz MS-05
Expected landing: Dec. 14, 2017

 
The Expedition 52 crew. From left to right: Jack Fischer, Fyodor Yurchikhin, Peggy Whitson, Paolo Nespoli, Randy Bresnik and Sergey Ryazansky. Photo Credit: NASA

The Expedition 52 crew. From left to right: Jack Fischer, Fyodor Yurchikhin, Peggy Whitson, Paolo Nespoli, Randy Bresnik and Sergey Ryazansky. Photo Credit: NASA


Currently docked and berthed spacecraft

Russian orbital segment

Zvezda aft

Spacecraft: Progress MS-06
Arrival: June 16, 2017
Planned departure: Dec. 7, 2017

 

Poisk zenith

Spacecraft: Soyuz MS-04
Arrival: April 20, 2017
Planned departure: Sept. 2, 2017

 

Pirs nadir

Spacecraft: Progress MS-05
Arrival: Feb. 24, 2017
Planned departure: July 20, 2017

 

Rassvet nadir

Unoccupied

 

US orbital segment

Unity nadir

Unoccupied

 

Harmony zenith

Unoccupied

 

Harmony nadir

Unoccupied

 

Harmony forward

Unoccupied

 

Orbital Velocity Blog

first-flower-space-station01.jpg

The crew on board the International Space Station conduct cutting edge research, inspire thousands of children into STEAM fields and is arguably a bigger, greater and more challenging project than going to the moon was nearly 50 years ago. This blog attempts to cover current events on ISS, profile groundbreaking experiments as well as fun facts associated with the orbiting outpost. 

Visit the blog ›

History of ISS

Space station concepts go way back—even before the beginning of the 20th century. This series covers some of those early concepts as well as the early Russian space stations in order to understand how and why the International Space Station was designed the way it was. Additionally, episodes will cover the construction process and the ups-and-downs associated with the most expensive object ever built.

Learn about ISS ›

Assembly Sequence

The International Space Station consists of 16 pressurized modules from various countries as well as an integrated truss structure with solar array wings spanning the size of a football field. It took over 30 individual rocket launches to take pieces up and over a thousand crew-hours of assembly via spacewalks.

ISS construction Gallery ›