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LIVE: Kounotori 7 launch

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— Mission overview —

The Japanese-built Kounotori 7 spacecraft is expected to send about 6,200 kilograms of science experiments, crew supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. The vehicle will also bring six large lithium-ion batteries to continue the replacement of the outpost's existing nickel-hydrogen batteries on the station's 110-meter-long truss.

Liftoff is expected at 17:52 UTC Sept. 22, 2018. It was set to launch a week earlier on Sept. 14, however, an issue with a liquid oxygen vent valve was found during a post-fueling inspection, forcing a scrub of that launch attempt so engineers could investigate.

When it does launch, liftoff will be from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Tanegashima Space Center on the island of Tanegashima located about 40 kilometers south of Kyushu, the southernmost of the four main island of the Japanese archipelago.

It is expected to rendezvous with the ISS and be captured by the 17.6-meter Canadarm2 robotic arm several days after launch and subsequently berthed to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module.

— Live updates —

NASA TV live coverage should begin about a half hour before launch.

— Manifest —

Internal payload

Inside the Pressurized Logistics Module, Kounotori 7 is carrying 4,300 kilograms. In addition to food and other crew supplies, this includes two U.S. experiment racks (EXPRESS Racks 9B and 10B), a U.S. Life Sciences Glovebox (which will be the second to be delivered to the ISS) and the European Space Agency-developed Life Support Rack.

 The HTV Small Re-Entry Capsule being sent to space aboard Kounotori 7: Credit: JAXA

The HTV Small Re-Entry Capsule being sent to space aboard Kounotori 7: Credit: JAXA

Additionally, a device called HTV Small Re-entry Capsule, abbreviated HSRC, will also be aboard. According to JAXA, it is designed to demonstrate reentry technology and cargo recovery functions from the ISS. Currently, the only vehicles that can return any cargo from the space station are the crewed Russian Soyuz spacecraft (which offers minimal down-mass capability) and SpaceX’s cargo Dragon spacecraft (which offers a large amount of down-mass capability).

HSRC is inside Kounotori 7 and will be attached to the hatch of the Pressurized Logistics Carrier by the space station crew before the spacecraft is unberthed. It will separate from vehicle after a deorbit burn and re-enter the atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean near Japan, descend by parachute and be recovered after splashdown, according to JAXA.

 A graphic of the Loop Heat Pipe Radiator. Credit: JAXA

A graphic of the Loop Heat Pipe Radiator. Credit: JAXA

Also inside the pressurized compartment is the Loop Heat Pipe Radiator, which is a technology demonstration system that is expected to test high-efficiency heat rejection technology. At some point after Kounotori 7 berth’s, the radiator experiment will be moved outside the space station via the Kibo module’s experiment airlock and the Japanese robotic arm will move it into position.

Finally, Kounotori 7 is bringing additional CubeSats to the ISS for deployment. According to JAXA, this will involve the 10th CubeSat deployment using the JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer since 2012.

According to JAXA, among the CubeSats being delivered are: SPATIUM-I, which will demonstrate electron density measurement, 3D mapping of the ionosphere and ultra-small atomic clock technology; RSP-00, which will demonstrate technology for imaging with an onboard camera and high-speed data transmission; and STARS-Me, which will demonstrate a small-scale space elevator using two satellites and a climber.

External payload

 The lithium-ion batteries loaded on an exposed pallet that will be placed inside the Unpressurized Logistic Carrier. Two of the batteries, right, can be seen. A total of six fit on the platform. Credit: JAXA

The lithium-ion batteries loaded on an exposed pallet that will be placed inside the Unpressurized Logistic Carrier. Two of the batteries, right, can be seen. A total of six fit on the platform. Credit: JAXA

Inside the Unpressurized Logistic Carrier is the six lithium-ion batteries to be used to replace some of the existing nickel-hydrogen batteries on the exterior of the outpost. This is a continuation of the process that began with the Kounotori 6 mission in early 2017.

Once at the station, at least two spacewalks by astronauts will be required to replace the old hardware with the new upgrades.

Some of the old batteries will be placed in the spacecraft's unpressurized compartment for disposal in the northwestern Pacific Ocean at the end of Kounotori 7's mission, expected around mid-November 2018. At least one more Kounotori flight will be required to fully replace the outpost's batteries.

 

— Previous Kounotori news —

Earlier Event: August 23
Progress MS-08 undocking
Later Event: September 27
Kounotori 7 berthing