Carbon-measuring instrument to be sent to ISS

Carbon-measuring instrument to be sent to ISS

When SpaceX’s CRS-17 Dragon spacecraft launches toward the International Space Station at the end of April, it is expected to be carrying with it a new carbon-observing instrument.

Called Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3, or OCO-3, the instrument is a follow-on to the still-active OCO-2 mission, according to NASA. Once at the ISS, it will be attached to the exposed platform on the Japanese Kibo module.

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ISS astronauts assemble tools for robotic refueling demo

ISS astronauts assemble tools for robotic refueling demo

If humans are ever to settle the Solar System sustainably, a number of technologies will need to be perfected, including in-space refueling.

As such, NASA created the Robotic Refueling Mission, or RRM, a series of experiments designed to understand and perfect technologies for robotic propellant transfer and help extend the life of spacecraft.

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‘Hundreds’ of impacts found on ESA’s Columbus module

‘Hundreds’ of impacts found on ESA’s Columbus module

Each International Space Station module is designed with micrometeoroid debris protection. A recent survey of the European Space Agency’s Columbus module shows just how much it is needed.

According to a news release from ESA, a survey performed Sept. 6, 2018, using the station’s 17.6-meter robotic arm showed “hundreds of impacts” across the surface of the Columbus module.

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Newly-delivered glovebox set to aid life science research

Newly-delivered glovebox set to aid life science research

Among the 6,200 kilograms of cargo that Kounotori 7 brought to the International Space Station is NASA’s new Life Sciences Glovebox to help with biological and physiological studies.

Designed to help with ongoing research relating to the impact of long-duration spaceflight on the human body, the glovebox is a fully-enclosed, acrylic-windowed facility about the six of a large fish tank.

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2 external instruments installed on ISS over New Year's holiday

2 external instruments installed on ISS over New Year's holiday

While many around the world celebrated the arrival of 2018 with champagne, fireworks and social gatherings, robotics operators at NASA’s Johnson Space Center rang in the New Year by working to remotely install new external instruments recently brought to International Space Station inside the trunk of SpaceX’s CRS-13 Dragon cargo spacecraft.

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ISS-CREAM installed outside space station

ISS-CREAM installed outside space station

One of the external payloads that rode uphill with SpaceX's CRS-12 Dragon spacecraft was the Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass Investigation, or CREAM (sometimes referred to as ISS-CREAM). This instrument, which is designed to look for the origins of cosmic rays, has now been attached to the exposed facility on the Japanese Kibo module.

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OA-7 Cygnus re-enters atmosphere after 2-month mission

OA-7 Cygnus re-enters atmosphere after 2-month mission

Burning up in a blaze of glory, Orbital ATK‘s OA-7 Cygnus cargo ship re-entered Earth’s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean June 11, 2017, ending its nearly two-month-long flight.

The spacecraft, which spent some six weeks attached to the International Space Station, delivered more than 3,300 kilograms of supplies to the outpost and, after unberthing last week, performed a fire experiment.

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S.S. John Glenn OA-7 Cygnus berthed to ISS

S.S. John Glenn OA-7 Cygnus berthed to ISS

After a four-day cruise to the International Space Station, Orbital ATK’s OA-7 Cygnus spacecraft, named S.S. John Glenn, was captured and berthed to the outpost.

Capture of the 6.4-meter long spacecraft by the station’s robotic Canadarm2 came at 6:05 a.m. EDT (10:05 GMT) April 22, 2017. Expedition 51 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency as well as Commander Peggy Whitson of NASA were at the Robotics Work Station in the Cupola window controlling the arm.

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