SpaceX’s CRS-12 Dragon capsule arrives at space station

SpaceX’s CRS-12 Dragon capsule arrives at space station

Some 36 hours after leaving Kennedy Space Center atop a Falcon 9 rocket, SpaceX’s CRS-12 Dragon capsule rendezvoused with and was berthed to the International Space Station. The cargo spacecraft is carrying more than 2,900 kilograms of supplies and science experiments.

Once the capsule was within about 10 meters beneath the Destiny laboratory module, Expedition 52 crew members Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency and Jack Fischer of NASA used the robotic Canadarm2 to pluck the spacecraft from space.

Read More

Final new first-generation Dragon launches toward ISS

Final new first-generation Dragon launches toward ISS

SpaceX sent its final new first-generation Dragon capsule into space Aug 14, 2017. Launching atop a Falcon 9 rocket, the CRS-12 Dragon cargo ship was sent on its way toward the International Space Station.

The spacecraft is loaded with over 2,900 kilograms of equipment, science experiments and food to the orbiting laboratory. It will spend 36 hours fine-tuning its orbit before rendezvousing to and berthing with the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module.

Read More

Falcon 9 engines ignite briefly in hotfire test days before CRS-11 mission

Falcon 9 engines ignite briefly in hotfire test days before CRS-11 mission

Just a day before Memorial Day, SpaceX performed its customary static fire test on a Falcon 9 slated to send the CRS-11 Dragon capsule to the International Space Station. The test took place at noon EDT (16:00 GMT), May 28, 2017, at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. The several-second ignition, as well as the following planned abort, was soon confirmed by SpaceX via its Twitter account.

Read More

Falcon 9 static fire test performed at LC-39A

Falcon 9 static fire test performed at LC-39A

Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A roared to life for the first time since the end of the Space Shuttle era, albeit for only a few seconds, as SpaceX conducted a static fire test of its Falcon 9 rocket.

Via a stream from Spaceflight Now, a plum of exhaust was seen on the north side of the pad indicating a successful test fire. SpaceX confirmed the test occurred minutes later via a tweet.

Read More