CRS-17 Dragon arrives at ISS with cargo, stray cable

CRS-17 Dragon arrives at ISS with cargo, stray cable

SpaceX’s CRS-17 Dragon spacecraft arrived at the International Space Station with fresh supplies and an unexpected cable that was supposed to fall away during launch.

The CRS-17 Dragon spacecraft contains about 2,500 kilograms of crew supplies, equipment and experiments for the six-person Expedition 59 crew.

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Historic Crew Dragon flight concludes with Atlantic splashdown

Historic Crew Dragon flight concludes with Atlantic splashdown

The historic Crew Dragon Demo-1 mission has come to a conclusion with a successful splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean not far from where its mission began six days ago.

Following a five-day mission attached to the International Space Station, the unpiloted Crew Dragon autonomously undocked at 07:32 UTC March 8, 2019, and began moving to a safe distance. The spacecraft left the vicinity of the outpost about 20 minutes later.

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'New era in spaceflight': Crew Dragon docks with ISS

'New era in spaceflight': Crew Dragon docks with ISS

For the first time since the end of the Space Shuttle program, a U.S. spacecraft designed to fly humans has docked with the International Space Station.

At 10:51 UTC March 3, SpaceX’s unpiloted Crew Dragon Demo-1 spacecraft made contact with the docking adapter at the forward end of the International Space Station.

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SpaceX completes 16th Dragon mission to ISS

SpaceX completes 16th Dragon mission to ISS

After spending just over a month attached to the International Space Station, SpaceX's CRS-16 Dragon spacecraft departed the outpost and returned to Earth.

Loaded with more than 1,800 kilograms of equipment and experiments for a return to Earth, Dragon was unberthed from the Harmony module at around 20:00 UTC Jan. 13, 2019.

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Falcon 9 with Crew Dragon vertical at Launch Complex 39A

Falcon 9 with Crew Dragon vertical at Launch Complex 39A

The year 2019 is already off to a fast start with multiple deep space encounters performed by several robotic spacecraft. Closer to home, however, another vehicle is being prepped for its first orbital flight: SpaceX’s Crew Dragon. However, schedule unknowns still remain.

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NanoRacks video showcases Bishop airlock ‘concept of operations’

NanoRacks video showcases Bishop airlock ‘concept of operations’

As soon as late 2019, another airlock is expected to be delivered to the International Space Station, but it won’t be used for astronauts or cosmonauts. Instead NanoRack’s Bishop airlock module will be utilized to deploy CubeSats and other external payloads for NASA and governmental or commercial customers.

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SpaceX’s CRS-15 Dragon splashes down in Pacific

SpaceX’s CRS-15 Dragon splashes down in Pacific

SpaceX’s CRS-15 Dragon returned to Earth on Aug. 3, 2018, after a month-long stay at the International Space Station. The capsule splashed down in the Pacific Ocean with cargo and research samples that were returned for further analysis.

Since July 2, the spacecraft was berthed to the Earth-facing port of the space station’s Harmony module.

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CRS-15 Dragon brings science experiments, artificial intelligence to ISS

CRS-15 Dragon brings science experiments, artificial intelligence to ISS

SpaceX’s CRS-15 Dragon cargo resupply ship has been attached to the International Space Station. the spacecraft rendezvoused with the orbiting outpost in the early-morning hours of July 2, 2018, and is expected to remain berthed for about a month.

Capture took place at 6:54 a.m. EDT (10:54 GMT) by the 17.6-meter Canadian-built robotic Canadarm2, which was under the control of Expedition 56 NASA astronauts Ricky Arnold and Drew Feustel at the robotics work station in the station’s cupola window.

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CRS-14 Dragon returns experiments, hardware to Earth

CRS-14 Dragon returns experiments, hardware to Earth

Wrapping up a one-month stay at the International Space Station, SpaceX’s CRS-14 Dragon cargo ship returned to Earth with several thousand pounds of equipment for repair and experiments for further analysis.

Splashing down just after 3 p.m. EDT (19:00 GMT) May 5, 2018, just off the coast of Baja California in the Pacific Ocean, the capsule completed its second flight into space.

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